Civic Participation

Widespread participation in civic life is a sign of healthy communities. Along with the economic capital required to build and maintain houses, stores, and businesses, many urban analysts now recognize the value of a community's "social capital," defined as the attitudes, relationships, and behaviors that foster cooperation. A functioning network of mutual obligation, trust, and support among residents can be a resource in itself to sustain the quality of life in communities. These indicators assess the strength of those social networks in our region's communities by looking at several forms of civic engagement.

2005
Indicator 10.1:  Voting in 2004 presidential election
Indicator 10.2:  Citizen contact with local government officials
Indicator 10.3:  Voluntary organizations to improve communities
Indicator 10.4:  Social ties and sense of community
Indicator 10.5:  Engagement in community

2004
Indicator 10.1:  Registered voters who voted in 2000 and 2002
Indicator 10.2:  Citizen contact with local government officials
Indicator 10.3:  Discretionary income given to charity
Indicator 10.4:  Sense of community
Indicator 10.5:  Engagement in community